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Patricia Morisonage

Patricia Morison

Birthday: March 19, 1915 (103 years) Died: May 20, 2018 (5 years Ago in Los Angeles)

HomeTown: New York City, New York, United States

Patricia Morison, who was stunningly beautiful and exotic, with long, dark hair reminiscent of Rapunzel’s, nevertheless became a star in her own right as a supremely talented diva on the singing stage despite being severely underutilised during her prime screen years at Paramount in the late 1930s and early 1940s. Her father, William Morison, was a writer and sometimes actor who billed himself under the name Norman Rainey. She was born in New York City on March 19, 1915, and her father was a playwright. During World War I, Patricia’s mother served in the British Intelligence Service. After receiving her diploma from Washington Irving High School in New York, Patricia attended classes at the Art Students League. She then continued her education by attending acting classes at the Neighborhood Playhouse and dance classes with the well-known Martha Graham. Patricia eventually became a dancer. At the time, she worked as a clothing boutique designer, which provided her with a reliable income. After making her debut on Broadway at the age of 19 in the play “Growing Pains,” which did not have a long run on the Great White Way, Patricia went on to understudy the famous Helen Hayes in her iconic role of “Victoria Regina.” She never continued on in life. In 1938, not long after Patricia made her debut in the musical “The Two Bouquets” opposite the musical star Alfred Drake, talent scouts from the studio Paramount tested her and scouted her out. At the time, they were looking for exotic, dark-haired glamour types to rein in their star commodity, Dorothy Lamour. The emerald-eyed beauty, who did in fact resemble Lamour, was signed and made her film debut the following year, showing great potential in the “B” picture Persons in Hiding. Her eyes were blue, and she had a sultry voice (1939). Patricia’s stock did not improve, however, despite such potential; thus, she was limited to supporting roles in B-grade westerns such as “I’m from Missouri” (1939), “Rangers of Fortune” (1940), “Romance of the Rio Grande” (1940), and “The Round Up” (1941). She parted ways with Paramount after a string of unsatisfactory performances in films including Night in New Orleans (1942), Beyond the Blue Horizon (1942), and Are Husbands Necessary? (1942), all of which were released in 1942. She also portrayed Empress Eugenie in The Song of Bernadette (1943), although the attention was seldom on her. She worked as a freelance actress in “other lady” parts, which included the Tracy/Hepburn movie Without Love (1945) and The Fallen Sparrow (1943). Her best chance at film stardom came as Victor Mature’s despondent wife who takes her own life (which was to have been shown on screen) in Kiss of Death (1947), but her juicy role was excised from the film because producers (or, more likely, the Breen Commission) felt audiences weren’t ready for such shocking displays. She was overlooked when cast in top leads at ‘poverty row’ programmers. Patricia had been honing her vocal skills and participating in USO tours all during the war years. After seeing her perform one evening in Hollywood, Cole Porter came to the conclusion that she had the necessary tenacity, feistiness, and vocal skill to portray the female lead in his upcoming musical. In 1948, over the objections of both the producer and director, stardom was clenched in the form of Porter’s classic musical-within-a-musical “Kiss Me Kate. As the sweeping, vixenish Lilli Vanessi, a severe-looking stage diva whose own volatile personality coincided with that of her onstage role (Kate from The Taming of the Shrew”), Patricia found THE role of her career, giving over 1,000 performances in all. Playing again alongside her former Broadway co-star Alfred Drake, Patricia basked in the multitude of glowing reviews, and such songs as “I Hate Men,” “Wunderbar” and “So In Love” rightfully became signature songs. Following this triumph, film work never became a top priority again. Patricia continued on successfully in the London version of “Kate” and went on to conquer other classic leads in the musicals “The King and I,” “Kismet,” “The Merry Widow,” “Song of Norway” and Pal Joey,” among others. Her last movie role was a cameo part as writer George Sand in the mildly received biopic Song Without End (1960) starring Dirk Bogarde as composer Franz Liszt. Patricia Morison was born on March 19, 1915 in New York City, United States. Patricia Morison died on May 20, 2018 at the age of 103 years in Los Angeles. Check below for more deets about Patricia Morison. This page will put a light upon the Patricia Morison bio, wiki, age, birthday, family details, dating, trivia, photos, lesser-known facts, and more.

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Patricia Morison Profile:

Patricia Morison Profile Information
Stage Name Patricia Morison
Real Name Patricia Morison
Profession(s) Actress, Musician,
Birthday March 19, 1915
Zodiac Sign Pisces
Death Died on May 20, 2018 (5 years ago) (Age: 103 years) in Los Angeles
Gender Female
Birthplace New York City, United States
Hometown New York City, New York, United States
Nationality American

Patricia Morison Family

Father: Not Available
Mother: Not Available
Brother(s): Not Available
Sister(s): Not Available

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Family and Personal Life

Patricia Morison‘ father’s name is Not Available and Patricia Morison‘ mother’s name is Not Available.

Patricia Morison Trivia

  • Patricia Morison was born in New York City, United States.
  • Patricia Morison’s birth sign is Pisces.
  • Patricia Morison, who was stunningly beautiful and exotic, with long, dark hair reminiscent of Rapunzel’s, nevertheless became a star in her own right as a supremely talented diva on the singing stage despite being severely underutilised during her prime screen years at Paramount in the late 1930s and early 1940s. Her father, William Morison, was a writer and sometimes actor who billed himself under the name Norman Rainey. She was born in New York City on March 19, 1915, and her father was a playwright. During World War I, Patricia’s mother served in the British Intelligence Service. After receiving her diploma from Washington Irving High School in New York, Patricia attended classes at the Art Students League. She then continued her education by attending acting classes at the Neighborhood Playhouse and dance classes with the well-known Martha Graham. Patricia eventually became a dancer. At the time, she worked as a clothing boutique designer, which provided her with a reliable income. After making her debut on Broadway at the age of 19 in the play “Growing Pains,” which did not have a long run on the Great White Way, Patricia went on to understudy the famous Helen Hayes in her iconic role of “Victoria Regina.” She never continued on in life. In 1938, not long after Patricia made her debut in the musical “The Two Bouquets” opposite the musical star Alfred Drake, talent scouts from the studio Paramount tested her and scouted her out. At the time, they were looking for exotic, dark-haired glamour types to rein in their star commodity, Dorothy Lamour. The emerald-eyed beauty, who did in fact resemble Lamour, was signed and made her film debut the following year, showing great potential in the “B” picture Persons in Hiding. Her eyes were blue, and she had a sultry voice (1939). Patricia’s stock did not improve, however, despite such potential; thus, she was limited to supporting roles in B-grade westerns such as “I’m from Missouri” (1939), “Rangers of Fortune” (1940), “Romance of the Rio Grande” (1940), and “The Round Up” (1941). She parted ways with Paramount after a string of unsatisfactory performances in films including Night in New Orleans (1942), Beyond the Blue Horizon (1942), and Are Husbands Necessary? (1942), all of which were released in 1942. She also portrayed Empress Eugenie in The Song of Bernadette (1943), although the attention was seldom on her. She worked as a freelance actress in “other lady” parts, which included the Tracy/Hepburn movie Without Love (1945) and The Fallen Sparrow (1943). Her best chance at film stardom came as Victor Mature’s despondent wife who takes her own life (which was to have been shown on screen) in Kiss of Death (1947), but her juicy role was excised from the film because producers (or, more likely, the Breen Commission) felt audiences weren’t ready for such shocking displays. She was overlooked when cast in top leads at ‘poverty row’ programmers. Patricia had been honing her vocal skills and participating in USO tours all during the war years. After seeing her perform one evening in Hollywood, Cole Porter came to the conclusion that she had the necessary tenacity, feistiness, and vocal skill to portray the female lead in his upcoming musical. In 1948, over the objections of both the producer and director, stardom was clenched in the form of Porter’s classic musical-within-a-musical “Kiss Me Kate. As the sweeping, vixenish Lilli Vanessi, a severe-looking stage diva whose own volatile personality coincided with that of her onstage role (Kate from The Taming of the Shrew”), Patricia found THE role of her career, giving over 1,000 performances in all. Playing again alongside her former Broadway co-star Alfred Drake, Patricia basked in the multitude of glowing reviews, and such songs as “I Hate Men,” “Wunderbar” and “So In Love” rightfully became signature songs. Following this triumph, film work never became a top priority again. Patricia continued on successfully in the London version of “Kate” and went on to conquer other classic leads in the musicals “The King and I,” “Kismet,” “The Merry Widow,” “Song of Norway” and Pal Joey,” among others. Her last movie role was a cameo part as writer George Sand in the mildly received biopic Song Without End (1960) starring Dirk Bogarde as composer Franz Liszt.

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